McDonald’s fights over rape of 14-year-old girl in Bethel Park by her manager

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McDonald’s Corporation and McDonald’s USA are fighting in the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas to be dropped as co-defendants in a lawsuit against a local franchisee for the rape of a 14-year-old girl inside the Bethel Park McDonald’s where she worked. “It’s hypocritical to say that we control everything that happens in the store, but if something bad happens to your daughter in this store, don’t turn to us, don’t look at McDonald’s, look at someone else. ‘other,’ Alan Perer, the teenager’s attorney, told Action News of Pittsburgh 4. A hearing was held on Wednesday before Judge Christine Ward regarding motions filed by defense attorneys. The man already convicted of raping the 14-year-old girl was her 42-year-old McDonald’s manager. , Walter Garner, who at the time of the assault was already a convicted pedophile and on Megan’s list. The lawsuit says the victim and other workers had complained of sexual harassment for which there was video evidence. “They saw him grope and fondle my young daughter and they didn’t do anything,” Perer said. “That’s why we say it’s beyond negligence. It’s punitive damages. It’s outrageous, it’s extreme.” A lawyer for the McDonald’s company argued that it had no legal duty to care for and protect franchisee employees. They establish everything that happens. You can walk into a store in Timbuktu, a McDonald’s, and you can be assured it will be the same service, the same quality,” Perer said. The franchisee argues in court papers that the girl shouldn’t be allowed to seek punitive damages. “Rice Enterprises filed, actually filed in court and said what you alleged happened in this case is not that bad. You shouldn’t be allowed to say it’s outrageous or egregious or that we were indifferent to the risk to this young girl,” Perer said. “You recognize there’s serious harm to someone, and an employee like this and you’re indifferent, you ignore it, what they did. It’s a higher level of liability than just ordinary negligence.” Lawyers for McDonald’s and the franchisee did not grant Action News 4 of Pittsburgh is seeking comment on what was argued in Wednesday’s hearing .

McDonald’s Corporation and McDonald’s USA are fighting in the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas to be dropped as co-defendants in a lawsuit against a local franchisee for the rape of a 14-year-old girl inside the Bethel Park McDonald’s where she worked.

“It’s hypocritical to say that we control everything that happens in the store, but if something bad happens to your daughter in this store, don’t turn to us, don’t look at McDonald’s, look at someone else. ‘other,” Alan Perer, the teenage employee’s attorney, told Action News 4 of Pittsburgh.

A hearing was held on Wednesday before Judge Christine Ward into the motions filed by defense attorneys.

The man already convicted of raping the 14-year-old girl was her 42-year-old McDonald’s manager, Walter Garner, who at the time of the assault was already a convicted sex offender and on Megan’s list.

The lawsuit says the victim and other workers had complained of sexual harassment for which there was video evidence.

“They saw him groping and fondling my young daughter and they did nothing,” Perer said. “That’s why we say it’s beyond negligence. It’s punitive damages. It’s outrageous, it’s extreme.”

A lawyer for the McDonald’s company argued that it had no legal duty to care for and protect franchisee employees.

“Now they (McDonald’s Corporation) prescribe that these stores are supposed to protect employees from sexual abuse and sexual harassment. They make the rules. They make everything that happens. You can walk into a store in Timbuktu, a McDonald’s , and you can be assured it will be the same service, the same quality,” Perer said.

The franchisee argues in court papers that the girl shouldn’t be allowed to seek punitive damages.

“Rice Enterprises filed, actually filed in court and said what you alleged happened in this case is not that bad. You shouldn’t be allowed to say it’s outrageous or egregious or that we were indifferent to the risk to this young girl,” Perer said. “You recognize that there is serious harm to someone, and an employee like this and you are indifferent, you ignore it, what they have done. It is a higher level of responsibility than ‘mere ordinary negligence.’

Lawyers for McDonald’s and the franchisee did not grant Action News of Pittsburgh 4 requests to comment on what was discussed in Wednesday’s hearing.

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